'Sunbaker' was taken while Dupain was on holiday at Culburra, on the New South Wales South Coast, at a time of popular optimism before World War II.

A print from the other negative was published in Dupain’s relatively obscure monograph of 1948.

During a camping trip in bushland at Culburra Beach on New South Wales’s south coast in 1937, Dupain took a number of photographs of his friend, Harold Salvage after a swim. Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. For commercial uses, please complete an online Reproduction Request Form. Max Dupain Sunbaker Shown in 12 exhibitions Exhibition history The Thirties and Australia, S.H.



Under the Sun: Reimagining Max Dupain’s Sunbaker is a new exhibition presented by the Australian Centre for Photography.

Dupain used a low-angle shot, which transforms the simple shapes of the man’s oval head and triangular torso into a mountain-like outcrop set against the horizon. Max Dupain Sunbaker (1938); dated 1937; printed (c. 1975) gelatin silver photograph 38.0 × 43.1 cm (image) National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Purchased with the …

Photo: National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Where possible, the image must be reproduced in full (no cropping or over-printing).

Sunbaker was taken while he was on holiday at Culburra, on the New South Wales South Coast, in 1937, a year of popular optimism before the War. Multimedia in the new Australian War Memorial Galleries.
Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Last modified on Thu 26 Mar 2020 14.35 GMT, Photograph: State Library of New South Wales, Photograph: Michael Waite/Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley 9 Gallery, Photograph: Courtesy Christian Thompson and Michael Reid Gallery, Photograph: Courtesy Nasim Nasr and Greenaway Art Gallery, Photograph: Courtesy Kawita Vatanajyankur and Stills Gallery, Photograph: Courtesy Khaled Sabsabi and Milani Gallery, Brisbane, Photograph: Courtesy William Yang and Stills Gallery, Available for everyone, funded by readers. Sunbaker c. 1938 Place made Culburra, New South Wales, Australia Materials & Technique photographs, gelatin silver photograph Primary insc signed & dated recto, l.r., pencil, "- Max Dupain '37 -" titled & signed verso, pencil, "Sunbaker 1937/- Max Dupain -" Dimensions printed image 38.6 h x … In 1937, while on the south coast of New South Wales, he photographed the head and shoulders of an English friend, Harold Salvage, lying on the sand at Culburra Beach.

Few images in Australia today are as recognisable as Max Dupain’s Sunbaker, 1937. A print of the photograph was purchased in 1976 by the National Gallery of Australia in Canberraand by the 1990s it had cemented its place as an iconic image of Australi… Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. 546 Dean Street, Albury NSW 264002 6043 5800mama@alburycity.nsw.gov.au. The Sunbaker was Dupain's most iconic portrait and probably Australia's most iconic image representational of its beach culture.We have just released a remastered hand print that is the largest and highest quality Sunbaker print ever produced.. How? It was not until the Australian Bicentennial celebrations in 1988 that the Sunbaker image started to acquire iconic status as an image encapsulating a way of life and values in Australia, perhaps nostalgically evoking a bygone, less complicated, era.

Max Dupain Retrospective 1930-1980, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 29 Aug 1980–28 Sep 1980. From: Anne Gray (ed), Australian art in the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2002.

Where an image is used in a hard copy publication one complimentary copy must be sent to: NGV Publications department And, of course, he is a gendered icon: the sunbaker’s Australia is a place for the autochthonic pleasures of men. It has only really been Australia’s image since 1975, when it began its rapid ascent into national iconicity as Dupain himself was suddenly produced onto the Australian cultural stage as a major modernist artist. Although it was taken many years after the First World War, memories of bronzed Anzacs were still strong enough to give this image a nationalist resonance for contemporary viewers. The sunbaker is completely relaxed and at one with the landscape. Sunbaker is a 1937 black-and-white photograph by Australian modernist photographer Max Dupain. This pictorial simplicity has no doubt contributed to the accessibility and popularity of the image, which is often referred to as Australia’s most iconic photograph. There are only a handful of artworks that have been as influential on the creation of a national psyche as Max Dupain’s photograph, Sunbaker, 1937.

It depicts the head and shoulders of a man lying on a beach, taken from a low angle. PO Box 7259 Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. ( Log Out /  The power of the image comes from being so close to the man’s body, though he remains unrecognisable and unknowable.
( Log Out /  It was not until the Australian Bicentennial celebrations in 1988 that the Sunbaker image started to acquire iconic status as an image encapsulating a way of life and values in Australia, perhaps nostalgically evoking a bygone, less complicated, era. It was on the poster of his first retrospective at the Australian Centre for Photography, it was subsequently published by two photography magazines and by the National Gallery of Australia on the back cover of a 1979 exhibition catalogue, and it was central to the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ 1980 retrospective curated by Gael Newton. Sunbaker Max Dupain, 1975 silver gelatin print from original 1937 negative By 1934 Max Dupain had struck out on his own and opened a studio in Bond Street, Sydney . By ticking the below box, you agree to these conditions: The artist, title and date of the work must be listed anywhere the image is reproduced, Max Dupain

Few images in Australia today are as recognisable as Max Dupain’s Sunbaker, 1937. Theme: At Ease Artist: Max DUPAIN Birth/Death: 1911–1992 Title: Sunbaker Credit Line: Purchased 1976 National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. By 1934 Max Dupain had struck out on his own and opened a studio in Bond Street, Sydney. Prior to 1975 the two negatives had sat untouched in Dupain’s negative files for thirty years.

Geoffrey Batchen, “Creative Actuality; The photography of Max Dupain”, Art Monthly, pp2-5.

Sunbaker (1938); dated 1937; printed (c. 1975) The iconic photograph has been described as "quintessentially Australian", a "sort of icon of the Australian way of life", and "arguably the most widely recognised of all Australian photographs."

Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. He lies with his back exposed to the sun, seawater and sweat sparkling on his skin. The image was inspired by the work of European modernist photographers, who were interested more in exploring abstract form than in making descriptive photographs.

The Sunbaker has been Dupain’s image since 1937, when he quickly made two negatives of his close friend Harold Salvage during a holiday to the South Coast.

The sunbaker represents the Australian nation as a whole, but he also sensuously embodies each of our own individual relationships to Australia as a place: our fond memories of its summers, its beaches, its ‘lifestyle’. Max Dupain Sunbaker Shown in 12 exhibitions Exhibition history The Thirties and Australia, S.H. Dupain used a low-angle shot, which transforms the simple shapes of the man's oval head and triangular torso into a mountain-like outcrop set against the horizon. Although it was taken many years after World War I, memories of bronzed Anzacs were still strong enough to give this image a nationalist resonance. He lies with his back exposed to the sun, seawater and sweat sparkling on his skin. Few images in Australia today are as recognisable as Max Dupain’s Sunbaker, 1937. He realised that the manifold meanings it was generating were drawing it out from under the mantle of his authorship. The Sunbaker has come a long way, yet it remains simultaneously a private snapshot and public icon. In 1937, while on the south coast of New South Wales, he photographed the head and shoulders of an English friend, Harold Salvage, lying on the sand at Culburra Beach .