All Rights Reserved. Bring back the Boston Rag Tell all your buddies That it ain't no drag Bring back the Boston Rag. Hi Lonnie!" The afterlife.

[24], Countdown to Ecstasy was met with positive reviews. Copyright © 2020 Something Else!. I must say, I'd never thought of The Boston Rag as a reference to Old Glory, but that makes more sense to me than anything I've ever heard or thought regarding the meaning. It also has the footloose, most-anything-goes spirit of the early years. Hubris of hippies. Morbid thoughts are allowed, right? Nixon inattentive to domestic concerns ("on the phone"). 1’ (2020), The Curious Case of the Pretty Things: Shadows in Stereo, Jack Henderson – ‘Where’s the Revolution’ (2020), The Evolution of Yes’ Timeless ‘Roundabout’: Gimme Five, Ted Gioia: Music, Books and Popular Culture. My best, uneducated guess is that Walter Becker wrote the two verses—he all but admitted to such when he once stated in an interview that the song is about his native New York, not Boston—and Donald Fagen penned the chorus. by Michele Feller Report definition. He reinserts the tampon back in the vagina, this finishing the boston rag. Wählen Sie diese Option an der Kasse. For those reasons, I like to spin up the Countdown To Ecstacy disc every so often to bring back “The Boston Rag.”.

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Used by many rappers, most notable Ice Cube and the Geto Boys. And yet, it also calls to my mind Todd Rundgren, who was at the same time generating some piano-based pop hits that had these little jazzy riffs in them. "The Boston Rag" develops from a jazzy song to unrefined playing by the band, including a distorted guitar solo by Jeff "Skunk" Baxter. These characters hang around the corners of the entire Steely Dan discography, but they come into their own on Countdown to Ecstasy". Pedal steel from Jeff Baxter discreetly nudges its way into consciousness on the second verse, a minor assist that gives the song a big lift at the right time (who knows, maybe that’s why I like the “swept the playroom” line so much). Agnew, Nixon, etc. He reinserts the tampon back in the vagina, this finishing the boston rag.

One might assume that the "Lady Bayside" in the lyrics is a reference to the great borough of Queens, but beyond that I think everyone's on their own for interpretation. (I dunno, but say it was.). Contact Something Else! “The Boston Rag” is a solid deep cut that boasted a smart arrangement, hipster lyrics and complex song anatomy that in some aspects pointed the way toward that urbane, classic Steely Dan sound.

, this can probably be forced to fit current events of those times, if. Share it. [6] It comprises uptempo, four-to-five-minute rock songs,[7] which, apart from the bluesy vamps of "Bodhisattva" and "Show Biz Kids", are subtly textured and feature jazz-inspired interludes. [19], The album was titled as a joke about attempts to rationalize a state of spirituality. Like Steely Dan's 1972 debut album Can't Buy a Thrill, Countdown to Ecstasy has a rock sound that exhibits a strong influence from jazz. So let’s go score some pills. Fagen was probably referring to some old jazz tune, while Becker spins some drug-themed tale with some connection to his own life from a prior era. [10] Bop-style jazz soloing is set in the context of a pop song on "Bodhisattva".

So "The Boston Rag" was part of a state of mind..

I’m telling you, buddy, it ain’t no drag. Bop-style jazz soloing is set in the context of a pop song on "Bodhisattva". The proofs for the album cover were later stolen during a dispute over the final layout. video premiere, Chicago, “One From the Heart” from ‘Twenty 1’ (1991): Saturdays in the Park, Yes, “In a World of Our Own” from ‘Heaven and Earth’ (2014): YESterdays, Stephanie Angelini and Vince Tomas, “Midnight Blue” (2020): One Track Mind, Ian Dury – ‘Hit Me: The Best of Ian Dury’ (2020), Daniel Carter, Patrick Holmes, Matthew Putman, Hilliard Greene + Federico Ughi – ‘Telepathic Mysteries Vol. "The Boston Rag" develops from a jazzy song to unrefined playing by the band, including a distorted guitar solo by Jeff "Skunk" Baxter. Whatever! President Richard Nixon announced the U.S. invasion of Cambodia. He fled to the U.S.). There aren’t a whole lot of lyrics to this song, but I’ve never been quite able to decipher them and from what I gather from a quick scan on the internet, no one else seems to be too sure what they mean, either. [30] In 2000, it was voted number 307 in Colin Larkin's All Time Top 1000 Albums. "[31] Pat Blashill later wrote in Rolling Stone that the "joy in these excellent songs" and in the band's playing revealed Steely Dan to be "human, not just brainy," "like good stretches of the Stones' Exile on Main St."[9] AllMusic's Stephen Thomas Erlewine found Countdown to Ecstasy musically "riskier" than the band's debut album, and wrote that the songs are "rich with either musical or lyrical detail that their album rock or art rock contemporaries couldn't hope to match.